Friday, September 5, 2008

Strength In Number







This is the view of the base of the Culver Viaduct at 3rd Avenue between 9th and 10th Streets, a block South (more or less) of what's recently been identified as the Revolutionary War era burial grounds of the 256 Maryland men killed as they fought to allow the rest of the colonial army to cross the Gowanus and escape from British troops.



From what I've read, the dead lie somewhere near that sunlit walkup a block into the picture. I believe there's a massive construction site on that block, right across from Carousel Beverages and Power Play. You have to wonder what they might dig up in there.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

I don't konw what they could do at this point, but it really is shameful that this site is not even marked to remember those who gave their lives in the founding of this nation.

amarilla said...

I think a lot can still happen in honor of these brave men, after all, this discovery seems to be fairly recent but I don't have much of the story. Perhaps more from my source would be of interest?

Ruth Edebohl's comments, CUE

Lisanne McT said...

There is a really really stupid fence with art on it around a condo (the J condos) thats being constructed near my house on Bond & 3rd that is proclaiming that "young revolutionary war heroes are buried on these grounds" not only did she get the location wrong but WHY would anyone want to live ON TOP OF THAT!!!

amarilla said...

I'd like to see that fence. Maybe the J Condos should advertise that "the dead make very quiet neighbors." The new units across the street from Green-Wood on Terrace, I think, look very quiet indeed!

Brenda from Flatbush said...

Given the response when they uncovered the African Burial Ground in downtown Manhattan, one wonders why there's no more effort made here to honor the dead...

amarilla said...

That's a good point! Maybe we need another Minerva or Liberty in Gowanus.

isaac said...

#1,

I believe there is a historic plaque on the American Legion building on 9th St.